Friday, April 24, 2015

Annual IDRA La Semana del Niño Parent Institute yesterday PHOTOS online on Flickr page: http://budurl.com/IDRAflkrApr15

La Semana del Niño Parent Institute 
Photos

Annual IDRA La Semana del Niño Parent Institute yesterday photos online on Flickr page:




Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Live-streamed sessions (CST) Webcast: Family Leadership for Student Success Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio

Webcast: Family Leadership for Student Success
Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
Video Streamed by NowCast livestream where participants can view and participate via chat
http://bit.ly/IDRAInstitute
Live-streamed sessions (CST)
Session 1 / Sesión 1  9: 45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Biliteracy Project / Proyecto de alfabetización en dos idiomas
Presenters / Oradores
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD
Ms. Fabiola Cicena
Ms. San Juanita Lerma
Ms. Wendy Lerma
Ms. Maria Muñoz

Session 2 / Sesión 2 10:55 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Comunitario PTA
Presenters / Oradores
ARISE PTA Comunitario
Ms. Ludivina Escalante
Ms. María S. Esparza
Mr. Pedro Nepomuceno

Session 3 / Sesión 3  12:05 p.m. – 1:05 p.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Fathers in Action / Padres en acción
Presenters / Oradores
San Antonio ISD
Mr. Ted Guerra
Mr. Luis Pérez




UNIVISION will be joining IDRA to share their Clave/Academia work


http://www.idra.org/images/stories/PI_banner.jpg
Family Leadership for Student Success
Liderazgo familiar en pro del éxito estudiantil
     #AllMeansAll    #TodosSonTodos
Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
Designed for families, community groups & educators of school-age children
This annual institute offers families, school district personnel and community groups from across Texas the opportunity to network, obtain resources and information, and receive training and bilingual materials on IDRA’s nationally-recognized research-based model for parent leadership in education. This institute is interactive and participatory.
All presentations are bilingual (English-Spanish).
See the event brochure and registration form (pdf in English) or (in  Spanish)



Webcast: Family Leadership for Student Success - Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio - #EdBlogNet @idraedu

Webcast: Family Leadership for Student Success
Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
Video Streamed by NowCast livestream where participants can view and participate via chat

http://bit.ly/IDRAInstitute   <<<

Live-streamed sessions (CST)
Session 1 / Sesión 1  9: 45 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Biliteracy Project / Proyecto de alfabetización en dos idiomas
Presenters / Oradores
Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD
Ms. Fabiola Cicena
Ms. San Juanita Lerma
Ms. Wendy Lerma
Ms. Maria Muñoz

Session 2 / Sesión 2 10:55 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Comunitario PTA
Presenters / Oradores
ARISE PTA Comunitario
Ms. Ludivina Escalante
Ms. María S. Esparza
Mr. Pedro Nepomuceno

Session 3 / Sesión 3  12:05 p.m. – 1:05 p.m.

Room 101 – Livestream: Fathers in Action / Padres en acción
Presenters / Oradores
San Antonio ISD
Mr. Ted Guerra
Mr. Luis Pérez




Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Of Challenge and Controversy (Why I Support Marylin Zuniga) JOSE VILSON APRIL 19, 2015 #EdBlogNet @idraedu

Of Challenge and Controversy (Why I Support Marylin Zuniga)

 JOSE VILSON JOSE
Prison is not justice.
When you’ve grown up with cousins and former students revolving in and out of Rikers and Sing-Sing, preferring incarceration to the instability of what we constitute as free, then you’d know why justice is not truly served by throwing people into jail and doing away with their lives. I’ve seen humans thrown in prison through human casualty, human error, human prejudice, and human cruelty, too. Society throws living organisms that represents said persons, breathing carcasses bereft of the souls that once made their indiscretions youthful. The masters of the day often dictate what justice looks like, with policemen and women willing to execute on said distortion and judges preside over the show, obeying a set of abstract laws that the people supposedly want. That’s why the masters always say “the people vs.” even if we the people didn’t actually elect or select the person representing us, and, in many cases, we might object to an unfair carriage of whatever show happens in the courthouses. Thus, all prisoners are political as far as whatever the current politic is concerned.
That’s why, regardless of what we believe about former journalist and former Black Panther Mumia Abu Jamal and the murder of Daniel Faulkner, we must ask ourselves whether putting Abu Jamal on death row would a) bring Faulkner’s life back and b) show others the humanity it takes to still believe in the humans our society has placed there.
Thus, I support Marylin Zuniga, burgeoning social justice educator. When the story first hit, conservative forces including the local Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association began to descend upon her, and in certain circles, doxx her at every opportunity they got. Other mainstream news sources picked up on the story as well, including The Root, but I got involved because Orange, NJ is close enough to New York City for it to hit home. The stirring headlines read similar to yellow rags during McCarthyism or what one might read in James Bond flicks during the Cold War.
None of this made sense to me, so I asked the people on the ground. After numerous conversations with close friends and fellow educators in the area, it didn’t take much time for me to jump feet first in supporting her by calling her superintendent’s office and via this erudite hashtag, which I did not create but I take some credit in amplifying.
The first honest question I get is, “If your son was in that class, would you want your son’s teacher delivering letters to a killer in jail?” The answer depends on how we phrase the question. I would have wanted Ms. Zuniga to request permission from me and the other parents in the class before hand-delivering the letters, even if my son requested that she send his letter to Abu Jamal. I would also want assurances that names and addresses were scrubbed from the letter. I would also hope it was in the context of a lesson in restoration and rehabilitation for those in dire straits. But ultimately, yes, this is a fine activity. The second honest question I get is, “If this was a KKK member who had killed a Black kid, would you have the same feeling about this?” In my disposition, the answer is a complicated yet. If I believe in social justice, and I do, and the context of the lesson was compassion and rehabilitation, then I would want that letter sent.
My activism is predicated on what is necessary at the time I activate. Thus, I, like so many others, including the parents of her students, demand complete reinstatement for Ms. Zuniga. Looking at the breadth of vitriol thrown in Ms. Zuniga’s direction, one must realize that negotiating from the middle (“give her a suspension until the next school year and have her under a two-year probationary period with mentors”) is a losing strategy for what people close to the situation would call an honest rookie mistake.
The third honest question for anyone following this should be, “Why this? Why not other cases that merit your attention?” To that end, we as a whole need to challenge ourselves to work through the things we consider imperfect and complicated. Race as a social construct is more complicated than Black and white, so why would we expect situations that involve race to get simpler with race as an ingrained layer? 21st century activism means delving into situations where the heroes and villains haven’t been narrated for us, or are simply ideas, and, instead, work with the given elements to restore a sense of peace, akin to the classrooms we occupy. More so, how do we demand the difficult work of working through racial situations of others when we have so much to do of this ourselves? Self-healing matters.
To paraphrase Dr. King, the ultimate measure of a person isn’t during times of comfort and convenience, but during times of challenge and controversy.
During the last week, I fielded plenty of phone calls, messages, and e-mails either in support or against Ms. Zuniga, wanting to see if perhaps I made a mistake or my moral compass was jarred from a trying school year. I remain steadfast in the belief that I’m working with the same heart and mind that fueled so many of my successes and setbacks before. After reading and re-reading all presented material, this case falls right within my passions for social justice, the recruitment and retention of teachers of color, and due process for all educators, even those who are still early in their careers.
After ?#?ISupportMarylin? made national news, I reflected on what all of this advocacy meant while we wait for Ms. Zuniga to get due process. Many of us weather online threats accompanied by American flags, naval crests, and reasonable racists just to assure that social justice education could breathe for another school year in Orange and perhaps across the country. Similar avatars lined my messages when I advocated for boys and girls of color whether they were victims of police brutality, outdated immigration policies, or victims of educational inequity. Imperfect as the circumstances may be, we have to believe that our hearts and minds are in the right place. With so many of our youth knowing prison second-hand through their parents, their older cousins, their extended families, writing letters to prison is the catharsis that allows our children to hang on
Our words and activism can’t just reside behind lit screens and gray keyboards, but in the streets and the classrooms where our present and future learn. Until justice is truly served, not just for Ms. Zuniga, but for all social justice educators, fairly and equitably, we must lock arms.
Jose

About Jose Vilson

José Luis Vilson is a math educator, blogger, speaker, and activist. For more of my writing, buy my book This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education, on sale now.

Monday, April 20, 2015

'Family Leadership for Student Success--Conference (Video Streamed)' on RGV Equal Voice Network! Michael Seifert Invites #EdBlogNet @idraedu

A community network for organizing & action

Michael Seife…
Michael Seifert has invited you to the event 'Family Leadership for Student Success--Conference (Video Streamed)' on RGV Equal Voice Network!

Save the date: lifestream details will be forthcoming
Family Leadership for Student Success--Conference (Video Streamed)
Time: April 23, 2015 from 9:30am to 12pm
Location: varias
Organized By: IDRA
Event Description:
Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
(Live streamed--the details will go out soon)
Of particular interest will be the opening session (9:15-9:30)
Session 1: Biliteracy in PSJA (by parents and students)
Session 2:  PTA Comunitario Presentations (9:45-noon)
Designed for families, community groups & educators of school-age children
This annual institute offers families, school district personnel and community groups from across Texas the opportunity to network, obtain resources and information, and receive training and bilingual materials on IDRA’s nationally-recognized research-based model for parent leadership in education. This institute is interactive and participatory.
All presentations are bilingual (English-Spanish).
See the event brochure and registration form (pdf in English) or (in  Spanish)
Prekindergarten–Grade 16 (College) Topics – Parent and Community Group Presentations• Early Childhood Education• Literacy Development• Bilingual/ESL Education• Dropout Prevention• High School Graduation Requirements in Texas• College Access• Family Engagement

See more details and RSVP on RGV Equal Voice Network:
About RGV Equal Voice Network
RGV Equal Voice Network is a social network
RGV Equal Voice Network
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358 photos
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531 discussions
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To control which emails you receive on RGV Equal Voice Network, click here

Semana del Nino Bilingual Conference - UNIVISION will be joining IDRA to share their Clave/Academia work #EdBlogNet @idraedu

Semana del Nino Bilingual Conference -  UNIVISION will be joining IDRA to share their Clave/Academia work


Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
http://www.idra.org/images/stories/PI_banner.jpg
Family Leadership for Student Success
Liderazgo familiar en pro del éxito estudiantil
     #AllMeansAll    #TodosSonTodos
Bilingual Parent Institute • April 23, 2015 • San Antonio
Designed for families, community groups & educators of school-age children
This annual institute offers families, school district personnel and community groups from across Texas the opportunity to network, obtain resources and information, and receive training and bilingual materials on IDRA’s nationally-recognized research-based model for parent leadership in education. This institute is interactive and participatory.
All presentations are bilingual (English-Spanish).
See the event brochure and registration form (pdf in English) or (in  Spanish)
Prekindergarten–Grade 16 (College) Topics – Parent and Community Group Presentations
• Early Childhood Education
• Literacy Development
• Bilingual/ESL Education
• Dropout Prevention
• High School Graduation Requirements in Texas
• College Access
• Family Engagement
Highlights
• Bilingual presentations (English-Spanish)
• Roundtable educational presentations
• Parent interviews
• Live stream options
• Educational topics breakout sessions
• Refreshments and lunch
• Exhibitors, including service providers, college and universities and non-profit agencies
Administrator and Parent Liaison Track
There will be a special session for administrators and liaisons focusing on successful strategies for family engagement.
Event Registration
$50 per person
Registration includes presentations, materials, exhibits, refreshments and lunch
Mail registration form (one per person) with a check or purchase order to IDRA at 5815 Callaghan Road, Suite 101, San Antonio, Texas 78228 • Fax purchase order to IDRA at 210-444-1714 • Email purchase order to IDRA at contact@idra.org.
Make checks payable to: Intercultural Development Research Association. Purchase order numbers may be used to reserve space. Full payment prior to the institute is expected.
For more information, contact Ms. Jocellyn Rivera (e-mail contact@idra.org; phone 210-444-1710)
Hotel Reservation
Please call directly to these hotels and mention that you are a guest of the Whitley Theological Center and ask for their best rates. These hotels are in the general vicinity of the Whitley.
• Drury Inn – SA Airport & I-410 – 1-800-420-3854; has a free shuttle to and from hotel to the Whitley Oblate Center
• Hyatt Place – SA Airport/Quarry Market – 210-930-2333
• Hilton SA Airport – 210-377-4608
• Aloft Hotel – 210-253-8587
• Holiday Inn – 210-524-5905
Intercultural Development Research Association
IDRA is an independent, non-profit organization that is dedicated to assuring educational opportunity for every child. Sponsoring IDRA projects for this event:
• Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program
• 
South Central Collaborative for Equity Center (SCCE)
• Seeding Equity in Education through Dialogue (SEED)
• 
Comunitario PTA
Information about IDRA and our services is available online 

- See more at: http://www.idra.org/IDRA_Events/La_Semana_del_Ni%C3%B1o_Parent_Institute_2015/#sthash.epPVeA1f.dpuf

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

LCLAA Launches Young Latinos United - Youth Worker Leaders @LCLAA @cirealfaro @816Js@hviverosjr @jessemedinajr

LCLAA Launches Young Latinos United


Dear LCLAA Members, Friends, and Allies, 

Greetings from the National LCLAA Office. Spring has finally sprung and we hope you are enjoying the start of a new season. As we enter the month of April, we wanted to share the exciting work from our Young Workers Campaign. 

As you may know, the AFL-CIO hosted the NextUp Young Workers Summit in Chicago, Illinois on March 19-22, 2015. The AFL-CIO NextUp Young Worker Summit is an opportunity for the labor movement to engage and make key investments in their young membership to foster a network of activists that can continue moving a working class agenda. The summit convened over 900 young workers, including young LCLAA members, to discuss the issues affecting them at the workplace, in their unions, and in their communities.

LCLAA's Young Workers with
AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler

Today's young workers are part of the largest generation to enter the workforce since baby boomers and makeup up the most diverse, well-educated, and technologically savvy workforce in history. While young workers are rapidly changing our workforce, they are lagging in union membership. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 14 percent of all union members are young workers (16-34 years old). It is no secret that the longevity and success of the labor movement is tied to the recruitment and retention of young workers. 
LCLAA Latinos United at Fight For 15 Action in Chicago

 As part of LCLAA's commitment to fostering and providing opportunities for young workers, LCLAA sent a delegation of 11 members to host a workshop and expose more young workers to the mission of LCLAA and Latinos in the labor movement. The 11 young workers from across the country represented LCLAA and the over 2 million Latino trade unionists in the U.S. They organized more workers into LCLAA and educated them about the importance of fostering the young and innovative young Latino workforce. Through their work at the NextUp Summit, they were able to formalize LCLAA's first Young Workers group and recruit over 80 new members to LCLAA. Check out some of LCLAA's work at the NextUp Summit and the leaders of LCLAA's newly formed Young Workers group!



LCLAA WORKSHOP AT NEXTUP SUMMIT

LCLAA made a big splash at the NextUp Summit. The delegation of 11 LCLAA members in attendance hosted the "LCLAA: Latino and Proud" workshop to educate more workers about the importance of joining LCLAA. The interactive workshop taught participants the importance of Latinos in the country, workforce, and in the labor movement while encouraging them to engage more in their communities and LCLAA chapters. Check out some of the photos from the workshop here.  



LCCA WORKSHOP AT NEXTUP SUMMIT
The constituency groups within the Labor Coalition for Community Action (LCCA) represent the diverse communities within the labor movement, striving to both raise those voices and to mobilize together for a stronger movement for all working people. LCCA, with the partcipation of the Asian Pacific American Labor Alliance (APALA), Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU), Coalition for Labor Union Women (CLUW), Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) and Pride at Work hosted a workshop on the role of constituency groups. At a time when the labor movement is facing demographic shifts, decreasing density and is forging stronger relationships with the broader progressive movement the importance of constituency groups is evident. Check out some of the photos from the workshop here



LCLAA CHICAGO RECEPTION
Our Chicago Metro Area Chapter helped welcome our LCLAA Young Workers with an evening of food, solidarity, and mentorship. Chapter President Ron Maydon gave a toast of encouragement on all of the hard work and accomplishments of our young members. National Executive Board Members Cristina Barillas, Jose Guerrero, Angel Rivera, Jose Alcala and Rosendo Rocha also welcomed the Young Workers. A special thank you to J. David Cox, the National President of the American Federation of Government Employees for his continued support to Latino working families and for joining the LCLAA Young Latinos United in Chicago! Check out more photos on our Facebook here



LCLAA Welcomes Inaugural Young Workers Group 

As part of the AFL-CIO's NextUp Summit, LCLAA's delegation of young workers organized and formed LCLAA's first National Young Workers Group. The new national group "LCLAA Young Latinos United" will lead the efforts to recruit and train more young workers into LCLAA and the labor movement broadly.  The National LCLAA office is proud to present the newly elected officers of LCLAA Young Latinos United! We look forward to working with them to create the pipeline of future Latino trade unionists. Si Se Puede! 


Eric Alfaro
Chairperson
LCLAA Chapter: Sacramento

Eric has led a campaign to organize and unionize adjunct professors in the Bay Area and has supported a number of strike actions and fast food strikes in Northern California. He's actively involved in his community, currently serving as President of the Sacramento Chapter of LCLAA and being a member of the Sacramento Democratic Club.
Eric comes from a farmworker family in Northern California, where he learned that the labor movement is important because it is the only vehicle working people have to end income inequality and that power for working people is only obtained through organizing.

Twitter: @cirealfaro


Juan Sauceda Jr.
Vice Chairperson
LCLAA Chapter: Kansas City 

Juan comes from a labor family and recalls that during his upbringing it was always emphasized that the labor movement is something that not only has helped him but his family, friends and neighbors as well. He believes that labor is about highlighting the best of humanity, acting selflessly and showing compassion for all, and that those elements are what bring us together to fight for justice and build solidarity. His ideals for social change and admiration for fellow union brothers and sisters made him join UAW-GM. He is an active member of the Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Game on for Kansas, Kansas City Young Democrats, Young Democrats of America (YDA), and Young Democrats of Missouri (YDMO).

Twitter: @816Js


Erica Kane Capetillo
Recording Secretary
LCLAA Chapter: Greater Lansing Area

Erica was influenced by the labor movement at an early age. Her grandmother, Santa Gloria Capetillo, broke barriers within her organization becoming the first woman and Latina elected to be a union president. When Erica was 12 years old, she was asked to instruct a Youth & Unions Workshop at the University of Michigan Labor Studies Center. Her work with the Labor Studies Center dictated the work that she would later pursue. Since then she started to attend conferences, union meetings, and planning committees, which inspired her to speak up and volunteer to help others to help build a strong labor movement. She has reinforced her labor advocacy by taking charge of organizing meetings, events, and rallies in her community.  


Horacio Viveros Jr.
Financial Secretary
LCLAA Chapter: Sacramento

Horacio is a lead organizer with SEIU Local 1021 in Northern California. He works on strategic campaigns and is currently focusing on common good campaigns like the Fight for 15. He is the President of Next Generation, which is a young workers group with the Sacramento Central Labor Council in California. He recently graduated with a Master's Degree from Sacramento State University in Higher Education Leadership and Policy Studies. He is also a member of Nu Alpha Kappa National Alumni Association. He believes that the labor movement has turned regular jobs into jobs that give working people the dignity and pride to have a good paying job. Because of the labor movement, his dad who immigrated from Mexico was able to provide for his family.

Twitter: @hviverosjr


Jesus  "Jesse
" Medina
Sergeant of Arms
LCLAA Chapter: Chicago Metro

Jesse believes that the labor movement is the spinal cord of our nation and the primary component that keeps the middle class alive. He currently serves as the Head Person of his Building for the Custodial/Maintenance Department, an Executive Board member for SEIU Local 73, and Chief Steward for his entire Custodial/Maintenance Department on the contract negotiating team. He is an active member of SEIU's Latino Caucus and SEIU Local 73 Members Organizing Core. 

Twitter: @jessemedinajr


Francisco "Frankie" Zapata
Member at Large
LCLAA Chapter: South Florida

Frankie served in the United States Air Force where he earned a Medal for Global War on Terrorism/ OEF (Operation Enduring Freedom). He believes through the labor movement he is able to help others fight injustice, advocate for workers' rights, and build a movement that can impact the future of this nation. He is also a member of Florida AFL-CIO Young Workers.


Julie Gonzales
Historian 
LCLAA Chapter:Denver Metro

Julie hails from the centennial state, Colorado. She brings a wealth of experience to LCLAA as a skilled trade unionist. Julie grew up in a union household and joined the labor movement under the mentorship of her father, a union pipe fitter from Tecolote, New Mexico. During her tenure with UFCW, Julie has worked on over 47 union campaigns. She strongly believes that through a union, workers can achieve better working conditions collectively.